Posts Tagged ‘church’

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Canterbury – some random images

In Pictures from England on September 21, 2018 by cubsur51 Tagged: , , , , ,

A few pictures taken over the past two or three days. Most of Canterbury has been photographed a million times.

All that remains of the Worthgate. The inscription on the panel is dated 1833, shortly after the demolition of the gate.

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Probably because of the number of visitors, Canterbury still has more pubs than the average English city or town. These two are a little off the tourist trail, more authentic and worth a visit.

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St Mildred’s Church, parts of which pre date the Norman invasion of 1066 although it has been extensively changed in more recent times, but not much for the last 500 years or so!

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The river Stour flows through Canterbury in several channels. Until fairly recent times there were flour mills and tanneries within the city walls for which this was the water supply and power for the watermills.

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The Zoar Strict Baptist chapel dates from 1854 and is one of the few buildings in that area to have escaped the destruction of the 1942 air raid. It is built into one of the bastions of the city wall.

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Parts of the city wall and the bastions are restored and well preserved.

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Not so the skeletal remains of Canterbury Castle. Dating from the late 11th century it is now closed to visitors because its crumbling walls.

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One of the few streets in Canterbury that can be photographed without parked cars spoiling the view!

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A traditional and colourful greengrocer’s stall in the High Street.

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Trip to Messines Saturday 14th October

In Algarve,Portugal on October 16, 2017 by cubsur51 Tagged: , , , ,

Trip to Messines Saturday 14th October

Off to Messines to see my local football team, Imortal Albufeira, play in a local League match. It’s an easy trip for me as I can take a bus 50 metres / yards from my apartment all the way there.

São Bartolomeu de Messines, to give it its full name, is a town of about 8,000 people 23km (14.5 miles) north of Albufeira. It’s decidedly not touristy! It is among wooded hills on the edge of the ‘populated’ area of the Algarve. There is not a lot further north.

The hills from the railway.

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The town itself has a very old part near the church, which dates from 1716 and thus survived the earthquake of 1755.

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See the cracks in the marble though!

This is a well kept building by the church.

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And there is this little place to sit.

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Narrow streets, with a lot of empty and derelict buildings as is so common in many small towns.

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The more modern parts are fairly well kept however. The town has a little railway station, four trains go every day to Lisbon, three come back. The old station building and platform are no longer used, there are no station staff. The building is now used to house communications equipment.

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The modern station is not much used and weeds are not being being cleared.

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The neat football ground is fairly new, having replaced an older more basic facility elsewhere in town. it has a synthetic grass surface with a bewildering array of markings for 11-a side and small side pitches for the boys (girls football? Not here!) to play their games on. Before the start, a few players warming up.

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The scene at the bar at half time.

The match itself was horrible, we lost 1-0 despite them having had a player sent off after 25 minutes. Always lose to them it seems.

High above the town, modern windmills swish around, generating electricity.

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If you have half a day to spare, the trip out by car or bus (even train!) is fairly pleasant. There is a small indoor market every morning except Sundays and religious holidays. The ‘main street’ has a few places in which to eat and drink should you so wish. There are two small supermarkets in the centre should you prefer to take a picnic into the wilds.

Photos

Soulac sur Mer to be precise. My annual R&R visit. It has been insufferably hot and humid until 0445 this morning when a giant clap of thunder woke me rather brutally! Today has been much cooler and generaly more civilised on the weather front, although two more storms passed by later in  the day.

A couple of pictures. First , Soulac has its own miniversion of the London Eye. I shall go up there later. Should be some good views over the town as it is temporarily at least the highest point!

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Second, the historic church of Notre Dame de la  Fin des Terres, in the evening light. Thankfully the area in front, once a car park, has been cleared so people can enjoy the view. Parts of the church date from the 11th century.  It is one of the stops on the historic way from England to Santiago de Compostela. The church was threatened by sand dunes from the earliest days and by the middle of the 18th century had been completely buried, along with the village around it. A hundred years later work began to remove the sand and re-establish the church and village. Today, Soulac sur Mer has a resident population of about 2,100. This swells to tens of thousands in the summer months when holidaymakers, mainly from France and Germany, flock to the many campsites and mobile home parks in the area.

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IN FRANCE – SOULAC SUR MER

Tagged: , on July 23, 2013 by cubsur51

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